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It also seems as if just about everyone is considering an ICO but they go to great pains to avoid being classified as a security to be free of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulations. The regulators from both local (New York State) and federal agencies have taken a more aggressive stance recently with ICOs and cryptos in general. This could be a plus for the European and Asian markets as firms looking to launch might choose other countries with less aggressive regulators. The SEC recently announced that all ICOs will be considered as a security which means they will fall under their jurisdiction and will need to be regulated. The commissioner Jay Clayton has stated in regard to ICOs, “we regulate the offering of that security and regulate the trading of that security.” From what I have been told and learned some players were able to get around this security designation by using a Simple Agreement for Future Tokens (SAFT). Those with a SAFT invest in the firm’s technology but not in the firm. In other words they have no ownership stake in the firm itself. A small but key difference from IPOs for example. However, the new opinion by the SEC will change that. I am not a lawyer and will not pretend to give legal advice. I would suggest that if doing an ICO in the United States get a good lawyer who understands the latest regulations which appear to be changing by the week.

The New York Crypto and The City Scene

Written by Wayne Walker I am working yet again in New York City and I wanted to share some observations on the scene here in contrast to Europe. My viewpoint has a different angle because I grew up, studied, and worked the early parts of my career here before moving to Europe where I now live.

It’s safe to say, the crypto market is growing. While this growth has helped some people strike it rich, it’s also benefited the job market. Between December 2016 and December 2017, there was a 207 percent increase in job postings for Blockchain positions on Indeed.com. While the term “crypto career” might bring to mind technology and engineering professionals, there are a variety of jobs within the field, ranging from full stack developers to compliance officers and community managers. If you’re interested in one of these crypto careers, it might be a good idea to move out west. Unsurprisingly, the tech-savvy state of California employs nearly 30 percent of the country’s crypto employees -- the most of any state. Of course, if moving across the country is out of the picture, another 15 percent of crypto jobs in the U.S. are remote.

The Cryptocurrency Job Market Is Exploding (Infographic)

It can feel like a new cryptocurrency is popping up every hour, and that's because they basically are. There are more than 1,500 tradeable cryptocurrencies. In 2017 alone, there were between 2.9 and 5.8 million people using crypto wallets throughout the year, compared to 0.3 to 1.3 million in 2013. There's a $320-billion-plus market cap across all cryptocurrencies today. Related: 6 Ways Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Are Changing Entrepreneurship It's safe to say, the crypto market is growing. While this growth has helped some people strike it rich, it's also benefited the job market. Between December 2016 and December 2017, there was a 207 percent increase in job postings for Blockchain positions on Indeed.com.

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